KY Policy Blog

Kentucky’s Adult Education Challenge

By Jason Bailey
April 30, 2012

Education cannot solve all of our economic problems, as the many college-educated young people now unemployed and underemployed can attest. But low levels of educational attainment are an important reason for Kentucky’s economic challenges. A more skilled and educated citizenry is critical to building a Kentucky economy and society that can flourish.

While policy discussions of education often focus on children and traditional-age college students, Kentucky adults ages 25-54 face severe gaps in college attainment that impede state progress and family well-being. Those adults will be participating in the workforce read more

Budget Makes Education Goals Harder to Achieve with Cuts to Per-Student Funding

By Ashley Spalding
April 19, 2012

Kentucky has set high goals and taken great strides in improving educational achievement and degree attainment rates. However, the 2013-2014 state budget will make progress difficult over the next two years given its cuts in per-student funding for both P-12 and higher education.

Education Goals Budget Brief read more

The Benefits of Expanded Pre-School

By Jason Bailey
March 28, 2012

In its final days of negotiating a new budget, a sticking point between the House and the Senate is whether to include new dollars for the expansion of pre-school. The governor had proposed $15 million in 2014 for 4,400 new preschool slots for four year-olds, and the House put in $7.5 million for half that many openings. However, the Senate included no new money for pre-school.

Pre-school is an effective long-term economic development strategy. Economist Timothy Bartik examined the economic impact of universal pre-school programs and found that every $1 read more

Budget Would Further Reduce College Affordability

By Jason Bailey
January 25, 2012

Three stacks of books and large dollar stack.The barriers to affordable higher education–especially for low-income Kentuckians–will continue to grow under a budget that cuts funding to postsecondary institutions and limits need-based financial aid.

Budget Would Further Reduce College Affordability

The Governor’s budget includes cuts of 6.4 percent to higher education institutions. On top of previous cuts and because of rising enrollment, per student General Fund dollars for higher education institutions would be an estimated 22 percent lower next year than in 2008 under the plan (see figure below). More cuts would inevitably lead to tuition hikes on read more