KY Policy Blog

What You Need to Know About the AHCA’s Harmful Effects on Kentucky

By Jason Bailey
March 24, 2017

House leaders say they will take a do-or-die vote Friday on the American Health Care Act (AHCA), their plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Their proposal would dramatically reduce the number of Kentuckians with health coverage, make plans more expensive for those buying insurance through the marketplace and shift billions of dollars to the Kentucky state budget — all while providing large tax cuts to millionaires.

Here are KCEP’s resources on the impacts in Kentucky:

Kentuckians’ Marketplace Health Care Costs Would Rise $1,804 Under AHCA

The plan would read more

SNAP Works and Shows Where Economic Progress Still Needed

By Jason Bailey
March 24, 2017

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, played a key role in helping cushion Kentucky’s economy from the depths of the Great Recession. It continues to be a critical lifeline and economic stimulus for people and parts of the state facing ongoing economic challenges.

SNAP is designed to automatically help boost the economy when it falters. More people become eligible for the program when jobs are lost and incomes decline. That feature both supports families during hard times and counteracts the economic drag of lower spending. read more

Kentuckians’ Marketplace Health Care Costs Would Rise $1,804 Under AHCA

By Dustin Pugel
March 23, 2017

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides Kentuckians with a greater opportunity to gain health coverage. One way it does this is by offering financial help with purchasing insurance through the marketplaces that the law forms. In 2017, 81,155 Kentuckians purchased plans through Healthcare.gov, and nearly 4 out of 5 of them received financial help to buy those plans.

But the American Health Care Act (AHCA), designed to repeal and replace the 2010 healthcare reforms, would drive up the cost for people buying insurance through the marketplace by reducing tax credits read more

House Health Repeal Would Shift $16 Billion in Costs to the Kentucky State Budget

By Jason Bailey
March 22, 2017

The House Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), known as the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would cut federal funding for Medicaid in Kentucky by $16 billion over 10 years, according to an analysis by the Urban Institute. Making up that shortfall would require an increase in state Medicaid spending in Kentucky that would be bigger than all but one other state.

Cuts to Medicaid in the AHCA come in two ways. First, it would require Kentucky to spend approximately three times more than under read more

Trump Budget Eliminations Would Be Major Hit to Kentucky

By Jason Bailey
March 21, 2017

President Trump’s proposed budget would be a major hit to the investments that benefit Kentucky’s communities, as federal dollars play a substantial role in our state’s budget and economy. His budget would completely eliminate programs that provided more than $190 million in federal funding to Kentucky in 2016, according to an analysis from Federal Funds Information for States.

Those eliminations alone amount to nearly nine percent of all discretionary federal funding to the state. On top of those eliminations, the president’s budget would reduce funding for a wide range of read more

Tiny Fraction of Wealthiest Kentuckians Gain from Tax Cuts in Health Repeal

By Jason Bailey
March 20, 2017

The House plan to repeal healthcare reform, known as the American Health Care Act (AHCA), provides a tax cut to the wealthiest people while reducing the number of Americans with health coverage by an estimated 24 million, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Because Kentucky has relatively few high earners, we benefit even less from the tax cuts than almost any other state even while Kentucky has among the most to lose from people becoming uninsured under the plan.

Two of the biggest tax cuts in the AHCA are repeal read more

New Reports Highlight Kentucky’s Gains in Care and Health

By Dustin Pugel
March 17, 2017

Despite claims that Kentucky’s coverage gains were not met with access to care and better health, several recent reports and other data show quite the opposite is true. The well documented decline in the share of Kentuckians without health insurance is already reaping other rewards for Kentuckians.

Access to care is increasing

Kentuckians are able to get to the doctor more than before. According to a recent Commonwealth Fund ranking of state health systems, Kentucky jumped from 47th in the country to 39th between 2013 and 2015, in large part read more

Charter School Legislation Passes, But Questions and Concerns Remain About Funding

By Pam Thomas
March 17, 2017

The Kentucky General Assembly gave final approval to charter schools in the waning days of the 2017 legislative session after heated and lengthy debate in both chambers. The approval came in two parts, with the operating provisions included in House Bill 520 and the funding provisions in House Bill 471. The funding provisions in HB 471 raise new questions about how the funding for charter schools would actually work and many of the concerns we previously expressed continue as charter schools will inevitably divert funding away from our state’s existing read more

Funding and Accountability Concerns Still Apply to Senate Version of Charter Bill

By Ashley Spalding
March 15, 2017

An amended version of House Bill 520 passed the Senate Education committee this morning and is now heading to the Senate floor. The changes made to the bill were relatively minor and the concerns we expressed previously still apply.

The changes made to the version of HB 520 that passed the Senate include clarification around definitions (for instance, which mayors can be authorizers); when a traditional public school can convert to a charter; teacher qualifications; and the lottery process that occurs when more students are interested in attending a charter read more

More Federal Budget Cuts Would Especially Harm Kentucky

By Anna Baumann
March 13, 2017

More than one out of every three dollars Kentucky spends each year on health care, education, job training, child care, transportation and other critical programs comes from the federal government. These resources are now at risk of being cut deeply in President Trump’s forthcoming budget proposal this week, the ACA repeal and other looming Congressional attempts to slash programs Americans rely on.

A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities shows that 37 percent of total spending by the Commonwealth comes from the federal government, compared to read more